Netflix’s “The Witcher” Writer Reveals Why Nightmare of the Wolf Will Be Animated

Netflix hit gold with their new “The Witcher” series, there is no doubt about that, but one thing fans of the show are questioning is why is the spin-off film revolving around Vesemir, Geralt’s teacher and surrogate father, being animated? Well the writer of the show has an answer for that.

Witcher showrunner Lauren S. Hissrich, writer Beau DeMayo, and Studio Mir are currently all working on this project that will expand the world of “The Witcher” for audiences on Netflix. Comicbook.com got to speak with the writer of the show about their decision to go with animation, and to be quite honest… it makes sense.

I think from just… In terms of what the Witcher world is capable of, it is a massive canvas, and I actually started out my career working as an assistant and executive at Disney in animation, and it was there where I first got my job in the industry,” DeMayo said. “So I was aware when Lauren came and asked me to write it, what we could do in animation that you cannot do in live-action. There is not necessarily always parity between those two mediums. There are things that you can animate in an animated form that will look so amazing, so badass, that if you did it in action, in live-action, it’s just going to look goofy or it’s just going to register as a little false to the human eye.

“There’s a grace and an art form to animation, and especially anime, that allows a different flavor,” DeMayo continued, “So I think from Lauren and I’s perspective when we came at it, was what is the type of story we can tell? Which, I can’t tell you the story, but what is the type of story that we could tell that we could never tell in our live-action scope?

Animation, although not cheap in the slightest, allows the team to pull off some miraculous things that live-action can’t allow, and for a bit cheaper too. An animated dragon facing off with an animated Witcher can, in come cases, be much more intimidating than an obviously CGI dragon facing off with an absolutely human Witcher.

Something with magic and monsters and adventure and romance that you couldn’t necessarily use a live-action medium to tell, and I think when people see the anime and when it releases, there are very particular choices we made. And the script itself, there are certain things it takes advantage of in terms of animation that only animation can do. I think that’s what’s the most exciting thing that I’m waiting for fans to see. Is that, when you see the anime, it’s not just the events, it’s what Studio Mir has been capable of pulling off. It’s what our partners in the anime division at Netflix have been able to pull off. It is something… it is a story we could not have told in live-action in any way, shape or form. At least not with an incredible burden on production, I will say that.”



Netflix hit gold with their new “The Witcher” series, there is no doubt about that, but one thing fans of the show are questioning is why is the spin-off film revolving around Vesemir, Geralt’s teacher and surrogate father, being animated? Well the writer of the show has an answer for that.

Witcher showrunner Lauren S. Hissrich, writer Beau DeMayo, and Studio Mir are currently all working on this project that will expand the world of “The Witcher” for audiences on Netflix. Comicbook.com got to speak with the writer of the show about their decision to go with animation, and to be quite honest… it makes sense.

I think from just… In terms of what the Witcher world is capable of, it is a massive canvas, and I actually started out my career working as an assistant and executive at Disney in animation, and it was there where I first got my job in the industry,” DeMayo said. “So I was aware when Lauren came and asked me to write it, what we could do in animation that you cannot do in live-action. There is not necessarily always parity between those two mediums. There are things that you can animate in an animated form that will look so amazing, so badass, that if you did it in action, in live-action, it’s just going to look goofy or it’s just going to register as a little false to the human eye.

“There’s a grace and an art form to animation, and especially anime, that allows a different flavor,” DeMayo continued, “So I think from Lauren and I’s perspective when we came at it, was what is the type of story we can tell? Which, I can’t tell you the story, but what is the type of story that we could tell that we could never tell in our live-action scope?

Animation, although not cheap in the slightest, allows the team to pull off some miraculous things that live-action can’t allow, and for a bit cheaper too. An animated dragon facing off with an animated Witcher can, in come cases, be much more intimidating than an obviously CGI dragon facing off with an absolutely human Witcher.

Something with magic and monsters and adventure and romance that you couldn’t necessarily use a live-action medium to tell, and I think when people see the anime and when it releases, there are very particular choices we made. And the script itself, there are certain things it takes advantage of in terms of animation that only animation can do. I think that’s what’s the most exciting thing that I’m waiting for fans to see. Is that, when you see the anime, it’s not just the events, it’s what Studio Mir has been capable of pulling off. It’s what our partners in the anime division at Netflix have been able to pull off. It is something… it is a story we could not have told in live-action in any way, shape or form. At least not with an incredible burden on production, I will say that.”

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