Rainbow Valley…The Darkside Of Mt. Everest

Be Prepared…

Every year around 800 people attempt to climb Mt. Everest, traversing the treacherous landscape to make it to the top of the world. Due to the harsh conditions of the world’s highest peak, some climbers don’t make it. The images below may be disturbing to some and might not be safe for work.

Around 26,000 ft up the historic peak lies The Danger Zone. Why is it called The Danger Zone? Due to the fact that oxygen levels at that altitude are so low the human body simply cannot survive unaided. Most climbers are aware of the harsh conditions in The Danger Zone which is why carrying an ample supply of oxygen tanks is an absolute must. Sadly when climbers don’t have enough supplementary oxygen they will slowly suffocate and die. As a result, Mt. Everest is littered with the mummified remains of climbers that did not complete the trek to the top of the mountain, or faced challenges on their way back down. This specific region has gained the nickname “The Rainbow Valley” in reference to the brightly colored clothing worn by the unfortunate climbers (as can be seen below).

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Rainbow Valley is located around the Northeast Ridge Route where mountaineers are greeted by the ghastly site of over 200 frozen cadavers. Many companies involved in the facilitation of these epic climbs charge a disheartening $30,000 to recover the remains of an individual. It is rumored that climbers have to sign a waiver agreeing to leave their bodies behind if they perish along the perilous path, or pay the amount mentioned before.

Aside from Rainbow Valley, there is also a grim landmark called “Green Boots Cave”. Its name comes from a deceased climber named Tsewang Paljor who is suspected to have curled up in the cave while wearing green mountain boots.

The infamous “Green Boots”

Some famous mountaineers who have perished over the years are George Mallory, Peter Boardman, and Hannelore Schmatz. More information on these and other unfortunate adventurers can be viewed in the touching tribute video below.

Rainbow Valley serves as a warning to other climbers that Everest is not kind. Be cautious, and be prepared.